Witney gazette dating

When Johnson was re-elected in May 2012 he did get a free gift, the job of Police and Crime Commissioner for London which now comes as an added extra to the mayoral job.

Johnson palmed the job off immediately (via delegation of powers) to his deputy, Stephen Greenhalgh.

In August 2013, Greenhalgh signed an order [5] requesting a quarter of a million pounds to conduct a "consultation" exercise (and to asses the signage required to facilitate ANPR camera sharing between Tf L and MPS - not to pre-empt the consultation's outcome or anything).

Greenhalgh's "consultation" was launched in February 2014 on the 'Talk London' website [6], which allowed registered users to take part in an exhaustive four question survey containing gems like: "Tf L have around 1400 cameras on major roads in London, collecting vehicle number plate data which is currently used to enforce congestion and low emission zone charges.[...] Do you think the police should or should not have access to data collected by these cameras to help them tackle crime?

It was then that government began to increase its areas of concern, shifting from a non-interventionist attitude regarding many domestic affairs to the current position where there are few areas of public and even personal life in which they have no concern at all [1].

Whilst enjoying the increased reach of government, those in power still felt hampered by the normal legislative process and so looked for sneaky ways to circumvent it.

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Disturbingly, the police now act as though they too are administrators - through their central role in decision making and the equally contrived justifications they give for their actions.

In 1929, further to inspiring a parliamentary committee to investigate Ministers' Powers, then Lord Chief Justice, Lord Hewart coined the phrase "Administrative Lawlessness" to describe a worrying trend in English politics - the exercise of arbitrary power, where decisions are made in the shadows, not based on evidence and without proper scrutiny.

Hewart wrote [3]: "Arbitrary power is certain in the long run to become despotism, and there is danger, if the so-called method of administrative "law", which is essentially lawlessness, is greatly extended, of the loss of those hardly won liberties which it has taken centuries to establish." In 2017 Hewart's language may seem antiquated but in our not so distant past words like "liberty", "constitution" and "freedoms" were in common usage.

Emails released under the Freedom of Information Act (FOI) reveal a veritable jamboree of such prestidigitatory justifications constructed by the police.

These, along with other key documents [13] that help understand the policy, were not released until months after the consultation ended.

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